Sign DNX Assemblies with Your Own Key... and Test Under DNX Core

autofac, net, testing comments edit

Autofac DNX support is under way and as part of that we’re supporting both DNX and DNX Core platforms. As of DNX beta 6, you can sign DNX assemblies using your own strong name key.

To use your own key, you need to add it to the compilationOptions section of your project.json file:

  "compilationOptions": {
    "keyFile": "myApp.snk"

Make sure not to specify keyFile and strongName at the same time - you can only have one or the other.

The challenge we ran into was with testing: We wanted to run our tests under both DNX and DNX Core to verify the adjustments we made to handle everything in a cross-platform fashion. Basically, we wanted this:

dnvm use 1.0.0-beta6 -r CLR
dnx test/Autofac.Test test
dnvm use 1.0.0-beta6 -r CoreCLR
dnx test/Autofac.Test test

Unfortunately, that yields an error:

System.IO.FileLoadException : Could not load file or assembly 'Autofac, Version=, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. General Exception (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131500)
---- Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Roslyn.RoslynCompilationException : warning DNX1001: Strong name generation is not supported on CoreCLR. Skipping strongname generation.
error CS7027: Error signing output with public key from file '../../Build/SharedKey.snk' -- Assembly signing not supported.
Stack Trace:
     at Autofac.Test.ContainerBuilderTests.SimpleReg()
  ----- Inner Stack Trace -----
     at Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Roslyn.RoslynProjectReference.Load(IAssemblyLoadContext loadContext)
     at Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Loader.ProjectAssemblyLoader.Load(AssemblyName assemblyName, IAssemblyLoadContext loadContext)
     at Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Loader.ProjectAssemblyLoader.Load(AssemblyName assemblyName)
     at assemblyName)
     at assemblyName)
     at Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Loader.AssemblyLoaderCache.GetOrAdd(AssemblyName name, Func`2 factory)
     at Microsoft.Framework.Runtime.Loader.LoadContext.Load(AssemblyName assemblyName)
     at System.Runtime.Loader.AssemblyLoadContext.LoadFromAssemblyName(AssemblyName assemblyName)
     at System.Runtime.Loader.AssemblyLoadContext.Resolve(IntPtr gchManagedAssemblyLoadContext, AssemblyName assemblyName)

I ended up filing an issue about it to get some help figuring it out.

Under the covers, DNX rebuilds the assembly under test rather than using the already-built artifacts. This was entirely unclear to me since you don’t actually see any rebuild process happen. If you turn DNX tracing on (set DNX_TRACE=1) then you actually will see that Roslyn is recompiling.

If you want to test the same build output under different runtimes, you need to publish your tests as though they are applications. Which is to say, you need to use the dnu publish command on your unit test projects, like this:

dnu publish test\Your.Test --configuration Release --no-source --out C:\temp\Your.Test

When you run dnu publish you’ll get all of the build output copied to the specified output directory and you’ll get some small scripts corresponding to the commands in the project.json. For a unit test project, this means you’ll see test.cmd in the output folder. To execute the unit tests, you run test.cmd rather than dnx test\Your.Test test on your tests.

The Autofac tests now run (basically) like this:

dnvm use 1.0.0-beta6 -r CLR
dnu publish test\Autofac.Test --configuration Release --no-source --out .\artifacts\tests
dnvm use 1.0.0-beta6 -r CoreCLR

Publishing the unit tests bypasses the Roslyn recompile, letting you sign the assembly with your own key but testing under Core CLR.

I published an example project on GitHub showing this in action. In there you’ll see two build scripts - one that breaks because it doesn’t use dnu publish and one that works because it publishes the tests before executing.